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Architectural Spotlight

Delanoë tower

The not so subtle profile

The not so subtle profile

Open portion of the building level with the parisian rooftops

Open portion of the building level with the parisian rooftops

Paris decided to release the restriction on building heights and a number of new sky scrapers have been announced for the city of love. One of them is the new tower being designed by Herzog & de Meuron. It’s been nicknamed the Delanoë tower after the Parisian mayor who fought to have the restrictions lifted and will definitely be a memorable addition to the city skyline if only for being the first of the six currently being planned.

Design concept for the Delanoë tower

Design concept for the Delanoë tower

There are a couple of great blog posts about this one, though opinion seems to be a little divided on the web,  the folks over at AMNP are not all that impressed about the tower, I have to admit I also find that the shape of the tower is of the kind that will either become an icon or end up reviled. Only time will tell, they did after all call the Eiffel tower hideous when it was built. AMNP also brings us a translation from france3.fr that talks about the components of the project.

The base of the tower should host a convention center. Then upstairs, we must find a luxury hotel from 300 to 400 rooms and offices. But the mayor of Paris has also wanted the implantation of businesses, including luxury, style restaurants, including pan, bars, shops. Equipment should also have their place: swimming pool, library, public gardens suspended. The municipality would also present a “museum of world languages.” [translated text from France3.fr]

The building most definitely cuts a striking profile depending on which side you look at it from, thin side on it doesn’t take up too much space, but move one point on the compass and it is quite a bit more imposing.

The boys over at OHLALAMAG say bonjour to Paris First Skyscraper in 30 years, though opinions are swinging towards revile in the comments.

Dezeen has a pretty extensive chunk of information from the architects themselves and reveals a couple interesting factoids. Evidently the triangular shape is to keep the building from casting its shadow on any of the surrounding buildings. The building of course achieves this is by pushing it’s footprint into the area that it’s shadow falls and thus prevents any other buildings from being built in those spaces, but really we’re just splitting hairs. Oh and the shape also allows for optimum solar and wind power generation. I am sure Herzog & de Meuron are pulling that factoid out for the haters. What do you think? is Paris’ next skyscraper a oui or a non?

The streetscape

The streetscape

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